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How did the phrase "Ring a bell" originate?

1 user answered

Taran Luthra, Bilaspur
User, Level 8 Contributor
Ring a bell refers to something that is familiar to you.

The phrase originated during a time when people had no watches or alarm clocks to set their alarm to something. In those days, it was the bell that was used to notify people about the start of an event. The bell was the signal that reminded people of the event taking place.
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How did the phrase "Show true colours" originate?

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Taran Luthra, Bilaspur
User, Level 8 Contributor
The idiom 'showing your true' colours means to show someone's true character or personality.

The phrase is said to have originated in the late 1700s. At that time when ships went into battle, they would often hoist the flag of another country in order to trick their opponent into laying down their guard and think they were a friend. On getting close to the enemy ship, they would hoist their actual flag and attack the enemy.
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What does he term 'to take take a rain check' mean?

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Ram Kumar, Rajnandgaon
User, Level 9 Contributor
The phrase to issue a rain check means to postpone an event or agreement indefinitely to a later date with a commitment to renegotiate then. It has its origins in the United States. In the United States, if a sporting event had to be postponed because of rain, the spectators or fans who had booked tickets for the event would be given tickets which would allow them a free ticket for the same event which would be held at a later date. These tickets were called Rain Cheques. And with the passage of time, the expression was born.
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What is the longest alphabetically arranged word in the English alphabet?

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Ankit Sharma, Bangalore
User, Level 9 Contributor
It is Aegilops which refers to a kind of grass which is found in Europe and North America.

Additionally, it can also mean the style in the inner corner of the eye
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What is the meaning and origin of the phrase cold shoulder?

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Jeshma Orusu, Hyderabad
User, Level 6 Contributor
Phrase:
Cold shoulder

Meaning:
Expressing dismissal, disregarding or ignoring someone.

Origin:
Visitors to a house who were invited were served a hot meal and those visitors who weren't invited were served a cold shoulder of mutton. It was first used by Sir Walter Scott in his book 'The Antiquary', in the year 1816. The phrase was mentioned as 'cauld shouther' which means cold shoulder in Scottish. From here, the phrase should was used by many other authors in various books.

Usage:
- Don't give a cold shoulder to your dear ones.
- At times it is mandatory to give a cold shoulder to people.
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What is the meaning and origin of the phrase break the ice?

1 user answered

Jeshma Orusu, Hyderabad
User, Level 6 Contributor
Phrase:
Break the ice.

Meaning:
To start a conversation with a stranger or to commence friendship.

Origin:
In earlier days ships were the only means of transportation and there wasn't any road or railway transportation. At times in winters the ships used to get stuck in the frozen water. So, the receiving country would send small ships to break the ice to clear way for those ships coming to their country. This is considered as a gesture of friendship and understanding between the countries.

Usage:
- It's easy to break the ice at informal meetings rather than formal meetings.
- It gets difficult for introverts to break the ice.
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What is the meaning and origin of the phrase bite the bullet?

1 user answered

Jeshma Orusu, Hyderabad
User, Level 6 Contributor
Phrase:
Bite the bullet

Meaning:
Doing something painful, difficult or unpleasant.

Origin:
Before anaesthesias came into use, surgeons used the technique of making the soldiers bite the bullets while operating their wounds in order to divert their concentration away from the pain and also to prevent the soldiers from biting their own tounge. This technique was also implemented on soldiers participated in the American civil war. There are many more theories regarding the origin of this phrase but the former one is widely accepted.

Usage:
- Bite the bullet and go for it.
- He bit the bullet and apologized his friend.
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What is the maximum age limit in order to appear for the UPSC Civil Service exam?
Shahnaz Khan, Raipur
>The upper age limit for general category is 32 years.
> For OBC it is 35 years.
> For SC/ST it is 37 years.
> For ... [ See more ]